Alluvionic News

Junior Achievement of the Space Coast Hosts ‘Glasses for Classes’

Junior Achievement of the Space Coast, a 5-star JA office, hosted its “Glasses for Classes” event on June 26th at Hell ‘N Blazes in Melbourne, FL.  This event raised money for the organization, which has reached almost 12,000 Brevard students this year.  The organization’s mission is to inspire and prepare Brevard County young people to succeed in a global economy.  They offer programs such as financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and workforce readiness.  Alluvionic is proud to be a supporter of JA, and this year our CEO Wendy Romeu has joined their board.

More about the JASC:

The volunteer-delivered organization offers K-12 programs that foster work-readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy skills.  The JA uses experiential learning to inspire kids to dream big and reach for their potential.  They are proud to say that they have reached almost 12,000 Brevard County students this year.  Through their innovative partnerships between educators, volunteers, and the business community, they can help young people connect with relevant learning and the importance of staying in school.  The JA helps to build a bridge between what kids learn in the classroom and how they can apply it in the real world.  They seek to inspire students to develop competitive skills and confidence.  Their success bolsters the local workforce and contributes to the economic growth of our community.  JASC empowers Brevard County students to own their economic success.

Alluvionic Opens Second Location in Washington D.C.

To increase our presence with our federal customers, Alluvionic has opened a second location in Washington, D.C. with a view of the U.S. Capitol Building. Our Melbourne, FL location will now serve as our corporate headquarters.  The new office in Washington D. C. will give us the opportunity to make meaningful connections and will help to promote forward progress toward our goal of obtaining government contracts.

Wendy had the opportunity to meet Heather Wilson, the Secretary of the Air Force, in Washington D.C. with the Economic Development Commission as part of the 16th Annual Community Leaders Trip.  Secretary Wilson tweeted about the group saying “Great to chat w/ space coast community leaders about how Florida Coast partnerships enable our nation’s #space mission. Thanks again for the incredible care of our #Airmen and families @45thSpaceWing and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. @GenDaveGoldfein

When asked how she felt about meeting Heather Wilson, Wendy said, “It was an amazing honor to meet Secretary Wilson, and to make a difference for Brevard County.”

 

The Process of Risk Management

The Process of Risk Management

Risk management is one of the most valuable skills any business can have. It is the process of identifying uncertainties, good or bad, and proactively managing those risks and opportunities. Managing all risks and opportunities means having a clear plan set with steps, tracking, and accountability.

In order to be successful, a business needs to be prepared for anything. Ignoring a risk does not mean it will go away and hoping that an opportunity does not make it happen. Taking action and being prepared is what really works, and that falls largely on risk management. Risk management is an active process. If you are not looking for risks and opportunities, you are not performing risk management. It is more than filling out a form and putting it aside. The risks are there, and acknowledging them is what allows a company to find the best outcome and use that to their advantage. In other words, risk management makes your business run more smoothly and see better results.

See The Good

The idea of risk management seems to have a stigma of having to always revolve around negatives and problems within a company. But the reality is, risk management can be a good thing too! The businesses that use risk management effectively use it for both the good and the bad in order to see the best possible outcomes of both.

Risk management is more than looking for negative possibilities within a project; it includes looking for potential opportunities as well. It is often difficult to have risk identification sessions to include opportunities because people generally think of risks as possible negative impacts. To combat this issue, hold separate Opportunity sessions to get people in the right mindset. This will yield more chances to improve the project’s performance, schedule, cost, and quality. These opportunities should be recognized and appropriately dealt with to give the project the benefits that are available (such as reduced time or budget or increased quality).

Steps:

-Planning: When planning your project, it is important to identify track milestones that are based on the project’s identified risks. Identifying key milestones and evaluating your progress against them allows you to see when your project is going off track earlier than if you are only tracking to high-level milestones. The earlier you spot a problem, the more likely it can be corrected.

-Identification: Identifying the risks and opportunities is the only place you can start when working on management. Decide as a team what the risks and opportunities are so that you can move forward. This process can be done through a brainstorm meeting, email requests, or taxonomy. Every team is different, so decide what works best for you. Just make sure that all stakeholders are represented during whatever process you select. Additionally, risk identification is not a one-time event. Remember that risks and opportunities evolve as the company evolves.

-Analyze & Prioritize: When is the last time you reviewed your risks with your team? If you cannot remember, then it has been too long. The frequency of when you formally review risks should be in your risk management strategy and plan. Doing so will give you a chance to analyze and prioritize those risks. Discuss the risks as a team and decide what needs to come first and what can wait, based on the analysis of each risk.

-Response Planning: When planning your project, it is important to identify track milestones that are based on the project’s identified risks. Identifying key milestones and evaluating your progress against them allows you to see when your project is going off track earlier than if you are only tracking to high-level milestones. The earlier you spot a problem, the more likely it can be corrected.

-Execution: This is where you get to put all of your planning to the test. The key in executing risk management is communication. For example, if a project is using shared resources, utilize the risk management process to escalate concerns related to those shared resources. Mitigation for this should include collaboration with the other Project Manager or management. Potential impacts should be carefully evaluated and communicated to the steering committee, and other stakeholders per the communication plan.

-Evaluation: In order to know if a process works or needs improvement, it must be evaluated. After all tasks have been completed, revisit your identification system and gather feedback on what your team thought about the risk management system. What worked and did not work?

-Updating Lessons Learned: Feed the process! If something did not go as planned or did not have the desired outcome, change it. All processes are subject to change and nothing has to remain set in stone. After all, doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results is the definition of crazy. So be open to change and update any process that needs it in order to see the growth and progress.

Tip of the Week: Emotional Intelligence

Tip of the Week: Emotional Intelligence

Tip of the Week: In a project environment, Project Managers are faced with many complex issues.  Personality conflicts, a limitation of authority, complexity of work, and stress can all be a part of the project.  By understanding Emotional Intelligence, Project Managers can be more successful at managing these aspects. Emotional Intelligence is extremely important in this type of environment since the nature of project work is temporary.

To learn more about Project Management and EI, visit www.alluvionic.com.

Tip of the Week: Lessons Learned

project management and engineering

Tip of the Week: When performing lessons learned, try to schedule it as close to the event as possible so people do not forget the lesson. Another option is to have the team members document lessons along the way in a shared document on your team’s SharePoint site or shared directory.

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Tip of the Week 11/21/2016: Emotional Intelligence

project management and engineering

Tip of the Week: What is Emotional Intelligence and why is it so important?  Emotional Intelligence deals with both personal and social awareness.  It is a skill that can be developed and strengthened.  As a Project Manager, it is very important to develop your Emotional Intelligence to enhance several skills including communication, stress tolerance, time management, flexibility and teamwork.  These skills are crucial in a Project Based environment. To learn more about Project Management and EI, visit www.alluvionic.com.

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Tip of the Week 11/14/2016: Risk Management

project management and engineering

Tip of the Week: Risk management is more than looking for negative possibilities within a project; it includes looking for potential opportunities as well. These opportunities should be recognized and appropriately dealt with to give the project the benefits that are available (such as reduced time or budget or increased quality).

Click here for more tips.

Tip of the Week 11/08/2016: Risk Management

risk

Tip of the Week: Risk management is an active process of managing risks and opportunities. If you are not actively looking for risks and opportunities, you are not performing risk management. It is more than filling out a form and putting it aside. The risks are there, ignoring them will not make them go away.

Click here for more tips.

Tip of the Week: PMO Performance

project management and engineering

Tip of the Week: High-performing PMOs know the importance of assessing their performance continually. Assessing performance and reporting out the results reminds senior management of the value the PMO brings to the organization. Reporting on project-specific metrics is standard, but successful PMOs go beyond this by assessing project quality and by soliciting feedback from key stakeholders. And they do not stop there. They use the information they collect to continuously improve their practices, which encourages efficiencies and drives successful strategy execution. (PMI’s Pulse of the Profession In-Depth Report, 2013. Copyright and all rights reserved. Material from this publication has been reproduced with the permission of PMI.)

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Tip of the Week: PMO

Tip of the Week: Staying true to the goals of a project or program has always been a key element of success, but scope creep and new priorities not aligned to strategic goals can skew projects off-course. It is therefore important for PMOs to evaluate performance, be self-critical and assess work in the context of the organization’s overall success. This consequently reinforces the business value of the PMO and helps senior managers understand the contribution being made. (PMI’s Pulse of the Profession In-Depth Report, 2013. Copyright and all rights reserved. Material from this publication has been reproduced with the permission of PMI.)

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